apple-quietly-releases-another-patch-for-zero-day-rce-bug

Share news article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Apple Quietly Releases Another Patch for Zero-Day RCE Bug

Apple has quietly rolled out more updates to iOS to fix an actively exploited zero-day security vulnerability that it patched earlier this month in newer devices. The vulnerability, found in WebKit, can allow attackers to create malicious Web content that allows remote code execution (RCE) on a user’s device.

An update released Wednesday, iOS 12.5.6, applies to the following models: iPhone 5S, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad Air, iPad mini 2, iPad mini 3, and iPod touch 6th generation.

The flaw in question (CVE-2022-32893) is described by Apple as an out-of-bounds write issue in WebKit. It was addressed in the patch with improved bounds checking. Apple acknowledged that the bug is under active exploit, and is urging users of affected devices to update immediately.

Apple had already patched the vulnerability for some devices — alongside a kernel flaw tracked as CVE-2022-32894 — earlier in August in iOS 15.6.1. That’s an update that covered iPhone 6S and later, iPad Pro (all models), iPad Air 2 and later, iPad 5th generation and later, iPad mini 4 and later, and iPod touch (7th generation).

The latest round of patches appears to be Apple covering all its bases by adding protection for iPhones running older versions of iOS, noted security evangelist Paul Ducklin.

“We’re guessing that Apple must have come across at least some high-profile (or high-risk, or both) users of older phones who were compromised in this way, and decided to push out protection for everyone as a special precaution,” he wrote in a post on the Sophos Naked Security blog.

The dual coverage by Apple to fix the bug in both versions of iOS is due to the change in which versions of the platform run on which iPhones, Ducklin explained.

Before Apple released iOS 13.1 and iPadOS 13.1, iPhones and iPads used the same operating system, referred to as iOS for both devices, he said. Now, iOS 12.x covers iPhone 6 and earlier devices, while iOS 13.1 and later versions run on iPhone 6s and devices released after.

The other zero-day flaw that Apple patched earlier this month, CVE-2022-32894, was a kernel vulnerability that can allow for entire device takeover. But while iOS 13 was affected by that flaw — and thus got a patch for it in the earlier update — it does not affect iOS 12, Ducklin observed, “which almost certainly avoids the risk of total compromise of the operating system itself” on older devices, he said.

WebKit: A Wide Cyberattack Surface

WebKit is the browser engine that powers Safari and all other third-party browsers that work on iOS. By exploiting CVE-2022-32893, a threat actor can build malicious content into a website. Then, if someone visits the site from an affected iPhone, the actor can remotely execute malware on his or her device.

WebKit in general has been a persistent thorn in Apple’s side when it comes to exposing users to vulnerabilities because it spreads beyond iPhones and other Apple devices to other browsers that use it — including Firefox, Edge, and Chrome — putting potentially millions of users at risk from a given bug.

“Remember that WebKit bugs exist, loosely speaking, at the software layer below Safari, so that Apple’s own Safari browser isn’t the only app at risk from this vulnerability,” Ducklin observed.

Moreover, any app that displays Web content on iOS for purposes other than general browsing — such as in its help pages, its “About” screen, or even in a built-in “minibrowser” — uses WebKit under the hood, he added.

“In other words, just ‘avoiding Safari’ and sticking to a third-party browser is not a suitable workaround [for WebKit bugs],” Ducklin wrote.

Apple Under Attack

While users and professionals alike have traditionally considered Apple’s Mac and iOS platforms as more secure than Microsoft Windows — and this has generally been true for a number of reasons — the tide is beginning to turn, experts say.

Indeed, an emerging threat landscape showing more interest in targeting more ubiquitous Web technologies and not the OS itself has widened the target on Apple’s back, according to a threat report released in January, and the company’s defensive patching strategy reflects this.

Apple has patched at least four zero-day flaws this year, with two patches for previous iOS and macOS vulnerabilities coming in January and one in February — the latter of which fixed another actively exploited issue in WebKit.

Moreover, last year 12 of 57 zero-day threats that researchers from Google’s Project Zero tracked were Apple-related (i.e., more than 20%), with issues affecting macOS, iOS, iPadOS, and WebKit.

Related News

How to Craft Rich Data-Driven Infographics with Powered Template

How to Craft Rich Data-Driven Infographics with Powered Template

We’re living in a data-driven world, and this means that it’s imperative to share information in the most engaging and…
Meta Fined €265 million in Facebook Data Scraping Case in the EU

Meta Fined €265 million in Facebook Data Scraping Case in the EU

Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner (DPC) has placed yet another fine of €265 million ($277 million) on Meta following Facebook’s data…
Critical Flaw Exploited to Bypass Fortinet Products and Compromise Orgs

Critical Flaw Exploited to Bypass Fortinet Products and Compromise Orgs

While performing routine monitoring, Cyble’s Global Sensor Intelligence (GIS) discovered a threat actor is distributing unauthorized access to several Fortinet…